Activism for Introverts: Activism 101 for Introverts + Highly Sensitive People with Omkari Williams

Today, Badass Cross Stitch announced the next training in their How To Be A Good Human initiative. I signed up right away and am super excited for May!

Join me and REGISTER HERE!

My definition of activism probably isn’t the one you’re going to find in the dictionary. For me being an activist means that you are someone who takes consistent action, whether in front of the scenes or way behind the scenes, to advance a cause that you are passionate about. For me the size of the action isn’t the point, what matters is that you are regularly taking action to make a difference. That’s my definition of activism.

Omkari Williams

As an introvert who lives with depression and anxiety, most forms of traditional activism are uncomfortable, stressful, and sometimes terrifying. I know I’m not alone in feeling that way.

However, introverts are passionate people and crucial components of a social change ecosystem, and there is a lot we can do besides marching on the streets or participating in more intense and visible forms of direct action.

Increasingly, I do feel compelled to challenge myself to take actions outside my comfort zone. But events like this are very validating for those of us who sometimes feel that our introverted nature means that we cannot be “real” activists.

This workshop will give you a structure that you can use to build your personalized plan for consistent, meaningful activism. You’ll discover your activist archetype, connect to your origin story (what propelled you to want to make change), and figure out where you fit on the spectrum of activism.”

Badass Cross Stitch

EVENT DETAILS:

Sat, May 8, 2021
11:00 AM – 1:30 PM PDT (2.5 hours via Zoom)

This is a pay-what-you-can event. 100% of the donations go to expert facilitator, Omkari Williams.

About Omkari Williams

Omkari Williams is a speaker, coach for activists both experienced and new, a writer, and host of the podcast Stepping Into Truth: Conversations on Race, Gender, and Social Justice. She says, “Our stories are bridges and foundational in creating societal change. Leveraging the power of our collective stories creates meaningful change and helps bring justice to the world.”

www.omkariwilliams.com

About the How To Be A Good Human Series

This is a radical skill share series conceived and presented by Shannon Downey aka Badass Cross Stitch for folks who want to do more in service to a just world, but feel unsure where to start.

www.BadassCrossStitch.com

Activism for Introverts: Craftivism 101 – Climate Change w/ Badass Cross Stitch

Greetings introverts and craftivists, and a very happy new year to you too!

Just a brief post to share an event I signed up for and am very excited about this month.

Thanks to the generous support of the Center for Craft, the amazing Badass Cross Stitch will be working in collaboration with the Museum of Design, Atlanta GA to deliver FREE monthly Craftivism workshops. Each month will focus on a different topic. This month they will be exploring climate change.

The workshop includes an intro to Craftivism and a full embroidery 101 workshop.

You will be learning AND making a fabulous piece of fiber art in community with other rad humans. Fun guaranteed.

Badass Cross Stitch

The first event in the series is Wednesday, January 20th 4-6pm PST / 6-8pm CT / 7-9pm EST.

You can Register Here.

Do it!

Veganism of Color: Virtual Conference, 2019

I was excited to hear about the Veganism of Color: Virtual Conference coming up in September 2019. So I figured I’d spread the word and encourage people to explore the important work that the organizers are doing.

The conference is FREE, but you must register to reserve your spot.

Register:

To register for Day One, click here. To register for Day Two, click here.

Day One includes talks from the speakers listed below. Day Two is a Q&A Panel discussion with the same speakers.

I love that the conference is free and will be as accessible as possible to people around the world. At the same time, those of us who have the means might consider making a donation to Chilis On Wheels, or purchasing a book from Sanctuary Publishers (who are jointly hosting the conference).

For more information on both of these organizations, see below.

Speakers:

Some of the speakers I have heard of before (Starr Baker, Margaret Robinson), but most of them are new to me and I’m looking forward to knowing more about them.

Doreen Akiyo Nartey, ChildFreeAfrican.com 

Veganism, Sustainable Development, and the North/South Divide

This talk will raise questions about the international development and the role of privilege in defining the responsibilities of vegan activists of color in helping to spread consistent anti-oppression around the world. 

Starr Baker, Black Feminist Vegan/Fuel the People 

Food Justice, Community, and Advocacy 

This talk will discuss key elements of community-led food justice activism, including helpful insight on building Black/Brown vegan community, organizing vegan food justice efforts, and adding to or learning from the ones that already exist.

Prateek Gautam 

A Dalit’s Perspective: Casteism and Speciesism

This talk will discuss the interconnections of casteism and speciesism, including casteisms’ dependence on nonhuman animal exploitation to justify both human and nonhuman oppression (a term coined casteist speciesism).

Margaret Robinson, Academic Scholar/Lennox Island First Nation member

Decolonizing Body, Mind, and Spirit 

This talk will examine how approaching veganism from an Indigenous (L’nu/Mi’kmaw) perspective can help undo colonial damage and support food sovereignty.

LoriKim Alexander, co-director of Black Cuse Pride 

Black Queer Vegan Liberation

This talk will focus on the intersections of being Black, queer, and vegan while working towards liberation for both humans and nonhumans.

As you can see, there is much food for thought on the conference agenda. I think that anyone who is interested in race and social justice will get a lot out of it, so please don’t be dissuaded from attending if you’re not a vegan. I hope to ‘see’ you there, and in the meantime here is a little more information about the conference hosts.


Sanctuary Publishers

As I’ve mentioned before, in the run up to and aftermath of the 2016 Presidential Election, I all but stopped reading. With everything happening in the country and so many urgent issues to fight and focus on, I found that I didn’t have the attention span or the mental and emotional energy to sit down and read.

While I was unable to lose myself in a novel or even a short story, my eventual way back into reading was through non-fiction, specifically works that explored issues of race and social justice.

Soon after I became vegan, I sought out vegans of color in order to deepen my understanding of the interconnectedness of various forms of oppression.

As a feminist with a Master in Gender & Women’s Studies, I recognized parallels between patriarchy and the systemic structures and binary thought-processes that enable animal oppression. As a women who has experienced discrimination and levels of violence from men, I was comfortable making certain comparisons and analogies between the oppression of women and the oppression of animals.

Yet, as a white woman who has a long way to go in interrogating and dismantling my own participation in the perpetuation of white supremacy, I was confused and deeply uncomfortable at the idea of talking about the oppression of animals and the oppression of people of color in the same conversation. Intuitively I feel that all forms of oppression stem from patriarchy and white supremacy, but I don’t have the knowledge, language or experience to speak about this hugely complex and painful issue and, frankly, I think it’s better that I simply listen rather than speak.

Needless to say, I have a lot to learn and synthesize on this topic. Some of the many books I’ll be reading and contemplating in the coming weeks are all published by Sanctuary Publishers, namely:

“Countless folks aren’t critical enough about the interconnectedness of oppression and how it  impacts marginalized communities as well as other animals (i.e. sexism,  racism, classism, etc., which are greatly amplified under capitalism).  “Veganism in an Oppressive World” is a must read for anyone committed to  doing serious work around the dismantling of speciesism and all other  systems of oppression that are inherently at odds with life.”

-Kevin Tillman, Vegan Hip Hop Movement

Chilis on Wheels

I first heard about Chilis on Wheels when Million Dollar Vegan donated $100,000 to the non-profit so that they could provide food and support survivors of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico.

Through services such as meal shares, food demos, clothing drives, and mentorship, Chilis on Wheels work in areas all around the USA to help make veganism accessible to communities in need. They provide networks of support and build strong empowered communities within the areas that they serve.